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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the time y
strength, which is new york's coastal environment, that's what made new york new york, right? new york harbor, hudson river, to the erie canal, and you were out west. that was new york. what made manhattan manhattan was the underground infrastructure. that engineering marvel. once you now say, well, that can flood, and you can't even find a way to pump out the water, you take the greatest asset and you make it a liability. and it's a frightening premise to deal with, you know? i think that's one of the reasons why denial is so much easier. because once you say, yes, extreme weather is here to say, we have to redesign this environment environment, well that's a big undertaking and it's threatening to many. i think that's where we are. >> can new york city escape the sort of national flurosis? it's a fight on the national level. out of necessity, can new york state and new york city lead on this issue because we have to, even if the rest of the country isn't ready to arrive at any consensus and make any big national decisions? >> we're going to try. you know, what we practice in new york
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
at just the work environment where do you look at the home environment. a lot of habits that you have a development for home, you want people to practice safe computing wherever they are. whether or not it is their device from your device, or whatever kind of device. so i think that to sympathize with the public to the challenges and in a way that we did keep america beautiful, keep america safe, i think that we really need to do that. the second point -- i have three of them. the second point is that the sky is falling ocean is just hurting us. because people say yeah, right. but i think that we need to not communicate the sky is falling in the sky is just not going to fall. a lot of people compare now to what we did and there was a certain amount of sky is falling with y2k. the sky didn't fall. nothing fell out the sky. yet we felt we spent a lot of time and resources. last one i want to make is that it is difficult to share information when we have two political fortunes to classify. it is something that i need to know or communicate. i can't communicate what you guys right now. bu
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
environment. when jack markell ran he put together a blueprint for delaware. we have not done a good enough job of creating that environment. >> let us go to the follow up. we stand on the blueprint for delaware? >> we still of war to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to agree to dollar version. we have not been able to add as much as we would like. mr. gregg can say hispanic, but it is not spin. it is not spin to the people -- jeff craig can say is sprin. in. these are real jobs, real family is being put back to work. >> feel free to offer your opinion. >> it is then 30,000 unemployed from 18,000 additional who have dropped out of the workforce, people of taken part-time jobs, we can argue, but on election day those people will go to the polls and make a decision. >> of cited the high percentage of people in delaware and a part of their paychecks from the government. if you are to trim down the government are produced exasperatingly problem? >> i moved to delaware in the late 1980's. today the largest employer is the state of delaware, the second largest is th
women's healthcare, not a single one of those votes talked about the environment, not a single vote talked about transportation infrastructure, not a single vote were dealing on education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the 10th district and are critical votes. my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. >> if we look at the record this congress, which is the most uneffective congress we've had, you voted twice on the ryan plan that turns medicare. a voucher plan. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted on them on issue after issue. >> congressman dold, your vote on obamacare, why you vote against it? >> you look at the affordable care act. there are things in there that are positive. >> how come? >> because i think we want to call it by its name. long end short, we got 21 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on new set ten years doubled. this is going to be enormously troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. you're talking about a t
people think is the changing media environment. you mentioned we have not had prosecutions of reporters are media organizations, but i am wondering if your thoughts, and the challenges posed by the changing media landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints t
of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment, over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue, on every core issue -- >> moderator: okay. you raised an important one. congressman dold, your votes on obamacare. you voted against it. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, i think we can agree there are some things -- >> moderator: by the way, you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare. dold: i think we got 23 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on the ne
or the environment and not a single vote talks about transportation infrastructure. not a single one of those votes were dealing with education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the tenth district and i think are critical votes get my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. schneider: if you look at the record this congress which is the most ineffective congress we have had in our lifetime you voted on the ryan plan that takes medicare and turns it into a voucher program. he voted with congress over 200 times against our environment and over 28 times against obamacare. he has voted with them on issue after issue on every -- >> moderator: congressman's dold you voted against obamacare. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, we can agree there things are things that are very -- i think we want to call it by its name and frankly i don't want to offend somebody that might want to call it something else but the long and short of it is i think we have 21 new taxes on this.
that kind of individualized attention may be harder to get now in the environment that states are moving to. states really there in the degree to which the shift to automated method is being pushed versus just being offered as an additional opportunity for accessing the program. and so i think it's important to remember that not all low income population of access to the technology, to the internet or the same ability to be able to use it. we hear about prepaid cell phone plans being a problem for people when have to wait on hold for a long time or participate in an interview over the telephone. many states are closing local offices, which would mean that people live in remote areas have to drive farther if they do want to be able to see somebody and talk to things within. and are increased, or still have reports of uncommon benefits, lost paperwork, long wait times in person and on the telephone. and auto closure, which is sort of the way fancy way of saying that the state had the cheerios for people but didn't have the time to act on it so the computer automatically will close cases. and
. that could not be more out of touch. a big part of this district is the environment, and so much of our economy is based on our environment. there is a direct correlation, whether it is tour is a more realistic. >> presidential candidate michele bachmann came down here and floated that idea and i was all over her on a -- like a black eye on a pea. when you look at what has happened with planned parenthood, perhaps you should call kathleen sebelius, to whom the agency came out with saint planned parenthood is not doing mammograms. >> both of you have spent a lot of money. it is among the costliest congressional races in the country to support legislation that would limit the influence of outside groups, and is that necessary? >> that needs to be argued in front of the supreme court. the supreme court already made that decision. if you look at our record, we have an incredible amount, almost 95% from individual donors. i cannot help but that people want to donate. if outside groups, some have placed $5 million in attacks against me. so be it at my opponent's father created pack specifical
no matter what. we have created an environment that is toxic for businesses. we have radical deficit spending. we have a federal government out of control with the amount of red tape and things that they are imposing on businesses. we wonder why then we do not have any jobs and why that jobs are being sent overseas. talk is fine, but the fact of the matter is, the unemployment and the deficit and the whole situation with the economy speaks for itself. it is now working. big government is not the solution. >> thank you, congressman. our next question is a senior co editor for the globe news magazine. please ask your question. >> congressman akin, would you speak of your commitment to improving public school education in missouri? especially given the educational choices you have made for your own children. i am referring to your decision to home school your children and senator mccaskill's to send at least one of her children to private catholic schools. >> thank you for that question. all of us understand that education is critical. one of the things we have in america is something c
policies that promote a friendly business and living environments to wynn resorts our approximately 12,000 employees and gaming industry as a whole. they're in nevada, which is a swing state. that's a wink, wink, nod nod vote our way or we might fire you. they didn't say who to vote for on the presidential ticket, but i don't know if you could figure it out in this report watch. >> i created 250,000 direct and indirect jobs. that's exactly--the number is 250,000. that's 250,000 more than this interest, who i'll be damned if i want to have him lecture me about small business and jobs. i'm a job creator. guys like me are job creators. we don't like having a bull's eye painted on our back and the president as tried to put himself between me an my employees. >> how. >> by class warfare. by deprecating and calling a group that makes money billionaires and millionaires who don't pay their share. >> cenk: wait a minute. you are billionaires and millionaires and you're paying one of the lowest tax rates in american history. by pointing out the reality putting me between me and my employees--be
that come through their counties that have burst, spilling 50,000 barrels of oil into their environment. that is what happens when you bypass rules. we cannot let these large powerful interests create their own will. the lobbying firm in washington d.c. that represented the folks -- behalf have a diversified portfolio. -- we have to have a diversified portfolio. >> the company would have many jobs in wisconsin. she voted for the epa against the paper companies of wisconsin. i find it hard to believe that any congressman in from wisconsin would do that. she did. let me move to a different topic. >> jobs. we are that the heart of milwaukee. people are struggling. there are people in farms and rural areas that are struggling. what is the proper role of government in terms of trying to deal with this problem of long- term unemployment? or is it not really governments role? >> let's look at the history of this community. it used to be a big industrial manufacturing center of the state. closey of the company's or go overseas. so that is partly why did they focus on making things again in amer
of difficult to imagine a president with with that high of approval in this kind of environment the getting thrown out, getting rejected. host: thomas fitzgerald, who covers politics for "the philadelphia inquirer." thank you for being with us. but it back to your phone calls. mike from pennsylvania, democratic line. good morning. caller: the morning, steve and terry. with controversy about the voter id lot to suppress turnout, do you think that this will in any way suppress turnout? if so, will it be enough to affect the margins in any way? thanks. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that required pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id's. if you did not have one, they would provide you with one but you have to go through certain procedures to get one. more recently, in the last three weeks, a judge in our states simply set aside that particular provision of law so that when pennsylvanian is go to vote on november 6th, you will be asked to show one of those six forms of identification. if you do not have one, you will still be permitted to vote. your vo
these votes not a single one talked about women's healthcare or the environment, not a single one talked about the votes education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to the 10th district and i think are critical votes. >> if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective congress we've had in our life times. he voted twice on the ryan plan and voucher program. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times genls obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue. >> you raced an important one. congressman dole your votes on obama care you voted against it is why? >> the affordable care ak act, there are things positive. >> you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare? >> we need to call it by its name. we have 2 new taxes on this. the estimates on the new set of 10 years doubled so this is going to be troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. after two years it is doubling so i think this is troubling because small businesses are looking at how can i pay the penalty and tell people the
, it helps me see more in the natural environment, and hopefully, with a class like beliefs and believers, you get sensitized, you know, to seeing the issues that regard religion and beliefs and behavior out there. anybody else? >> yitzhak rabin said, during the israeli conflict with the palestinian- or the arabs, whatever- he said if he didn't know the bible very well, they never would have found the water holes, and he said, "if that's true, what about the rest of it?" >> yes, well said. i mean, that's what we talked about in one of our recent classes is the importance of biblical literacy, you know, at least in a country that seems to uphold it to such an extent. other comments, observations- things off the top of your head? >> this was in the wall street journal- you don't expect to find anything like this in the wall street journal- the title of it is, "praying is good medicine." and it's the story of a doctor who is sitting beside the bed of one of his patients and she is afraid that she's terminally ill, and so she asks him if he will pray with her, and he's so startled, he doesn't
view anything dealing with the environment as potentially damaging jobs. and romney had to pass a litmus test during the primaries, which, was in effect 'climate change is a hoax. don't trust the scientists. >> another largely ignored fact of life in 2012, a series of mass shootings. 2 killed and 9 wounded outside the empire state building. 7 killed at a university in oakland, california. 7 dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wounded at a movie theatre in aurora, colorado. and then there was this -- >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands -- >> congresswoman gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the pledge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> liberty and justice for all. >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theaters don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not in favor of new pieces of legislation on gun
. with the environment here i will focus on the buffer zone. is that israel's intentions are most visible and cause is the most striking. >> the important part of the economy severely degraded. it is destroyed. key factor is the book that some that has been unilaterally imposed since busta art and then gradually will widen in at the time. they are partially index of stations sensible. identified by the wynn. consequently the buffer zone with its 14% of the land area to encompass between 48 and 55% of the total land including many water rhodes. 95% is arable. those restrictions is an annual loss of $83,000 of potential produce. the extended buffers down down -- zone 20 nautical miles or reduce debt three where the waters are fall with a daily switch flow in excess of 23 million gallons. actually the arable land and maritime laws supersede but approximately 7800 said the agricultural land inside and outside of the buffer zone interest trees, crops come under serious, greenhouses. this has translated into the fact one-third of but one is water brown have the time to get into the history but i will hig
in a highly politicized and highly charged political environment, we simply, as the white house, and as the state department has collected information, they have gotten its to the american public. host: democrat from florida. go ahead? all right, we're going to move on to barbara. angie, are you with us? you are on the air. caller: when americans wake up on november 7th, they have been made the right choice of president obama. -- corporations running their country, they will regret their choice for ever. everything the president has done -- doing it -- he inherited bankruptcy of the whole country. -- shipped off the jobs to foreign countries. i lived through that. i have been a refugee almost all of my life. guest: a couple of the important points that you bring up -- one of them is that, i do believe that voters in florida and the voters in iowa, and voters across the country understand the depth of what this president and his team faced when it came in. today is the anniversary of the great crash in 1929. the dow did not come back to its pre-1929 levels until 1954. that is wha
was hoping we could talk a little bit about changing media environment. you mentioned that we haven't had a prosecution of reporter or media organization. but i'm wondering if you're faults are any challenges posed by the landscape, the emergency of the new organizations and technologies that might be as responsible and willing to listen to government requests. are we looking at the new era because of the kind of fragmentation of the media environment and what kind of challenges might there be for the classification regime and prosecutors going forward? >> you mean is aera journalist? >> it complicates the issue let's put it that way. it's not of "the new york times" >> neil? >> they're worried about the article on the front page of the post that has was that information you were thinking about now. all of new types of journalists or media operate under the constraints of the traditional media do. i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others when the of clauson for the information they think they have that information to the government and say look, you make the case for
environment. >> thank you. chris, so you start running drugs for a man named jeff andrews. can you describe for us the worst experience when you're heading up to wichita, right? >> yes, i never did drugs, so i don't understand the drug culture per se, but i'll never forget the first drug load iran was over 100 pounds. and we negotiated the price. i get in the car and start driving and all i can think was man, what happens if my car breaks down? what happens if i get a flat tire? what happens if they get in a wreck? i was out over the fact drugs or in my car. at that point, delusions and paranoia starts speaking in nbc's ghost behind every tree in cops behind every bush. i really thought i was going insane in that moment. >> she had a particularly ingenious disguise i thought. >> well, there's a ski mountain south of el paso sectors and skis in the car at the ski report. when i hit the border patrol check point, the border agent, they'd never question me before. when i was running drugs have as much younger and of course much better looking because i had hair. [laughter] so you would've neve
into cybersecurity and cyber warfare, the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and the networks as a new domain of war and yet we realized that maybe 1 in one dows and people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. so what we are trying to do it in the zero days a series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and a platonic idea is everybody from my mom and dad to congress and people around the country can understand, and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> cyberspace vulnerabilities, tonight at 8:00 eastern on the communicators, on c-span2. >> we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either increase the kind of approach that congresswoman wilson has embraced. she signed a pledge to support the cut, cap, and balance program. that is a tea party approach to balancing the budget. it has no new revenues, even for the wealthiest americans. it is so draconian that it would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time. or we can embrace a balanced
for my issues which are limited government and lower taxes and less regulatory environment. i think in colorado where you find is you move west across the united states. the republican voter is a closet-libertarian type loder where it is limited government. it is an old west at age, keep government out of our lives. you see democratic voters as evident by our governor who moved more toward the center. if they could have another moniker it would be the common sense party. limited government and less washington, d.c. involvement. >> the governor is a democrat. what is the makeup of the state legislature? guest: we have a slight majority in the statehouse so we control the state house. in the state senate you have a slim majority. our attorney general and secretary of state and state treasurer are three other statewide elected officials. the governor, democrat who is very popular is obviously a democrat. it is representative of the voting population which we are helter-skelter and we have democrats and republicans controlling all sorts of key offices. caller: i have two questions. gove
in creating the overall environment, the actual act is pretty quickly attributed directly on the insurgents. >> general -- >> thank you. just a final remark by me on this issue. protecting the civilian population is an absolute principle of this operation. without that protection this operation, in my view, would not be viable. and i think that is the view of all my counterparts and afghans as well. >> [inaudible] >> general and dame mary, the north atlantic council decides the rules of engagement. does the north atlantic council direct that in those rules of engagement if there was a possibility of a civilian casualty, that engagement should not take place, or is it a judgment call given down to the respective commander at the level that it's required to be made? in other words, if there's a possibility of a is civilian being hurt -- of a civilian being hurt by, say, a drone strike, it doesn't go ahead, or is it a judgment call made at another level? >> no. >> we are not allowed to give details on rules of engagement. >> indeed, i won't. but what i can say, the political guidance always gi
, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >>> we're now just four days from the presidential election, if you needed a reminder. >> i don't need it, and the candidates are kris crossing in a whirlwind of campaigning. >> they're working very hard, let's go to ohio right now, it has 18 crucial electoral votes. president obama won in 2008, but ohio went to george w. bush in 2004. obama was there today touting the new jobs report that showed stronger than expected hiring last month. but much
in the -- the structure and the -- the environment in the middle east. with the arab spring came a great deal of hope that there would be a change towards more moderation and opportunity for greater participation on the part of women and -- and public life and in economic life in the middle east. but instead we've seen in nation after nation a number of disturbing events. of course, we see in syria 30,000 civilians having been killed by the military there. we see in -- in libya an attack apparently by -- well, i think we know now by terrorists of some kind against -- against our people there, four people dead. our hearts and minds go to them. mali has been taken over, the northern part of mali, by al- qaeda-type individuals. we have in -- in egypt a muslim brotherhood president. and so what we're seeing is a -- a pretty dramatic reversal in the kind of hopes we had for that region. of course, the greatest threat of all is iran, four years closer to a nuclear weapon. and -- and we're going to have to recognize that we have to do as the president has done. i congratulate him on -- on taking out osama b
productive, less tense environment in the region. then you take israel even to compare it to taiwan, that issue was bracketed between the two countries, between china and the united states. it was bracketed. you could similarly have something between the united states and iran over the us rail and palestinian issue. but i must come back to this other issue. this is in our strategic interest to come to terms with iran just like china. when mao was in charge, when nixon went to see mao, he had just presided over the killing of over three million chinese. they didn't just have a nuclear weapons program, they had tested nuclear weapons. the interest here is what is in the u.s. national interest. even there this is another critical challenge for the united states. as middle eastern populations become more empowered and have more of a say in each of their countries, they are not going to vote for, they are not going to support a secular, democratic u.s. model for their governance. they're not going to do it. they're not going to accept or lobby for a complete copy of the islamic republic
. caller: there you go. my question is, i am 50 years old and worked 30 years in this environment and i never struggled for a job. we got thousands of people from wisconsin out here working. saving their livelihood, save their families. president obama wants to take away hydraulic fracturing after he's re-elected. and the coal industry. i'd like to hear your thoughts. guest: i think you have a good right to be nervous. the president obviously was a little deceptive during these debates here. you think he was for tracking and the keystone pipeline. all these issues. but frankly you got to judge the president not by what he said in these debates. you got to judge him by his record. the president needs to -- it the president spent $400 million, kind of trashing mitt romney, before the first debate. and trying to build up people's negatives about mitt romney. that disappeared in about 10 minutes in the first debate. and we have seen that now all across the country. for folks like you in north dakota, but frankly in all the states, you got to look at these two candidates and say, who is real
tense, less mill tar is particular environment in the region. then if you compare it to even taiwan, that issue was brabblingted between the two countries, between china and the united states. it was bracketed. you could similarly have something between the united states and iran over israel and the palestinian issue that is bracketed. i must come back to this other issue. this is in our strategic interest to come to terms with the islamic republic of iran, just like china. keep in mind, when mao was in charge, when nixon went to see mao, he had just presided over the killing of three million chinese. they didn't have a nuclear energy program, they tested nuclear weapons. the issue here is, what is in the u.s. national interest, not whether we think iranian government officials are good or bad, but even there, this is another critical challenge for the united states. as minor populations become more empowered in each of their countries they are not going vote for or support a secular democratic u.s. model for their government. they're not going to do it. they're not going to accept
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)